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Make Stitch Markers for Knitting or Crochet

3 March 2009 29,225 views 13 Comments

by heather

You can make a ton of stitch markers for either knitting or crochet using just a few supplies from the dollar store. Cute stitch markers are a fun gift for any knitters or crocheters in your life.

I love these little wooden beads found at Dollar Tree. I have a few ideas for the beads, but my first idea was so cute and easy that I ended up using all the beads I bought at the store just making stitch markers!

Stitch markers for knitting are fundamentally different than stitch markers for crochet. Knitting stitch markers are rings that slip on the knitting needles and stay there. Crochet stitch markers must be removable, so you want to use something more like a hook. I used safety pins for my crochet stitch markers, but you can also use earring hooks. If you are making knitting markers, you will also need to make a stop at the craft store for "cabone rings," which are sold in the knitting supplies section. I got a bag of 25 for 99 cents.

The wooden beads I bought came with a good length of elastic cord, so I used that for attaching the beads to the rings. I also found some waxed jewelry cord and crimping beads in my bead box, which both worked well without a beading needle, too. If you are making crochet markers, you might have everything you need on hand!

Project Materials:

  • Beads, $1 or on hand
  • Cabone rings, $.99 (for knitting markers only)
  • Safety pins or earring hooks, $1 or on hand (for crochet markers only)
  • Thread, elastic cord, waxed cord, or something to attach the beads to the rings, on hand

Total cost: FREE to $2.99

To make knitting markers:

Thread cord through a large bead, then around the ring, then back through the large bead. Feed through smaller bead, tie off with a square knot. Tuck knot into small bead, if possible. If you use elastic cord, you can stretch it a bit when you tie it, to make the beads snug.

It's best to leave a long length of cord to do the threading and tying, to avoid frustration with a too-short-to-tie cord.

When you're done tying, cut the cord.

To make crochet markers:

Follow the instructions for knitting markers, but use safety pins or earring hooks instead of cabone rings.

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13 Comments »

  • Paul Overton said:

    These are cool. Makes me want to make some manly stitch markers. I found some colorful buss fuses at Home Depot that might be perfect. Thanks for the inspiration!

    _Paul

  • Rachel said:

    Way cute, I’ll be linking!

  • LizAndrsn said:

    Nice job. And I saw those very beads yesterday at my local Dollar Store.

    Anyone else watching the economy turn their Dollar Store into a vast pit on nothing you’d feed your family, nothing to craft with, and just plain empty spaces on the shelves?

  • purejoy said:

    i am just now knitting a “block of the month” quilt with each block incorporating a new pattern each month. i use stitch markers but NOT THIS CUTE!! ohmygoodness, i’ll be the ENVY (not that that is a good characteristic to encourage) of the entire group. i’m heading out to get the rings RIGHT NOW, and i’ll be all over it only because i only have about a MILLION beads.
    thanks for the GREAT idea!! i’m inspired, whoo hoo!!
    ps awesome pictures!

  • Moiety said:

    You can also make knitting stitch markers (probably crochet too, but it would be more work) out of just plain wire and beads. Twist the wire over a larger gauge needle, put a bead over both ends, and twist the ends with pliers so the bead won’t come off and the edges aren’t sharp. I swear this makes more sense than my post does!

  • The 6 O'Clock Stitch said:

    Wonderful idea! I didn’t even know what a stitch marker was! Feel free to share this tutorial at Make & Tell Monday! Here’s the link to this week’s post.

    http://the6oclockstitch.blogspot.com/2009/03/etsy-deals-and-craft-tutorial-party.html

  • maryanne said:

    These are really cute!

  • ModernMama said:

    Just found your site – very inspirational! I’ve been making my own crochet stitch markers and I only use dollar store findings (beads, wire, etc.) I lucked out recently and found “lever” back style earrings at my local DS, and realized they are very sturday stitch markers! No sharp edges and they lock into place like a safety pin. Yay! I make them as gifts (in sets of 6), and was able to knock out 6 sets for under $6. It was a good dat at my house :)

  • Swaps and Stitch Markers! « Over the Moon and Sun said:

    [...] blog so I’m going to have a deeper look at it later when I get a bit more time. I like her crochet stitch markers though I’d like something a bit more fancy that I can include in swap [...]

  • Crochet Stitch Markers « Crochet Creep said:

    [...] There’s more, Im just too lazy to post stuff xP BUT I found this really cool site that gives you ideas on how to make cute markers: http://dollarstorecrafts.com/2009/03/stitch-markers/ [...]

  • Stitch Markers « The Knitter Nerd said:

    [...] can make your own since it’s not difficult. There are many tutorials out there, for example this one. I might do it one day. My pin will do for [...]

  • PeachPecan said:

    I really like the beautiful knitting stitch markers with the beads, characters, etc – but I am a crocheter & these aren’t practical!

    Thanks for the ideas on creating my own “fancy all dressed up” markers for crochet.

  • wesley E batton said:

    What a great idea this is. I’ve never even hear of this before. They are really cute. Can’t wait to make some of my own.

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