producebag

We’re all trying to be a little more earth-friendly these days, in any small ways we can. Did you know over a million plastic bags are consumed per minute, worldwide? You might already use reusable grocery bags when you go to the store, but how about those plastic produce bags? Here’s a solution that is cheap, practical, and cute! Customize some drawstring mesh bags from the dollar store to use as reusable bags for your fruits and veggies.

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The bags are already made and come in packs of four, so if you just want to use them as-is, they are a really inexpensive solution. I like to craft it up, though (and admit it, you do too, which is why you’re reading this right now!), so I wanted to add a strip of cute fabric to my mesh bag to dress it up a little bit. Can you believe I found this veggie -printed fabric in my stash? This is an ideal project for stashbusting because you only need a small strip of fabric.

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Project Estimate:

  • Mesh bag, $.25
  • Strip of scrap fabric, on hand
  • Sewing machine & thread, on hand

Total: $.25

If you can’t find these readymade mesh bags at the dollar store (I found mine in the cleaning supplies section), you can follow my instructions for making a loot bag to make your own. Just use a see-through fabric for produce bags so your grocery store checker can easily see your veggies and ring them up without hassle.

To Make:

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1. Open up a mesh bag and lay it out on your work surface. Cut a piece of scrap fabric to fit the bottom of the bag (leave the fabric extending about a half inch on each side, for seam allowance.

producebag62. Cut the bottom seam off the mesh bag.

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3. Cut up side seams from bottom of bag to the top of where the scrap fabric lies (about three inches, in my case).

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4. Lay scrap fabric right side down against outside of produce bag (I laid mine about two and a half inches from the bottom of the mesh bag). Sew across the edge closest to the bottom of the bag.

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5. Flip fabric down so right side is facing outward.

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6. Topstitch mesh to scrap fabric to reinforce. This is optional, but I did it to make it look nicer, and also because I don’t want one of these bags to break open at an inopportune time, so the extra reinforcement is a good idea.

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7. Speaking of reinforcement, you’re going to do “french seams” to finish the bag, for extra reinforcement. Keep the bag right-side out, and sew the scrap fabric to the back panel of mesh (you should be sewing around the sides and the bottom of the bag to close it up).

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Turn it inside-out, making sure corners are turned all the way out (use a pointy device like a chopstick to make sure they’re turned out… this photo shows a corner before it’s pointy). Sew around the already-sewn edges of the scrap fabric and the mesh. Make sure the mesh is completely sewn closed.

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Your bag is done! Now you have a cute and eco-friendly bag to use to bag your fruits and veggies! Now go put it in the car so you don’t forget it when you go to the store!